This is a very short episode: a reading of GK Chesterton's wonderful little reflection on drawing and virtue entitled 'A piece of chalk.' The original essay appeared in the Daily News, November 4, 1905. 

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In this episode, I read through Hans Christian Andersen's profound and wonderful little fairy tale, "The Silver Shilling," and offer a few reflections on its meaning. It has a lot to say about how we navigate our own lives with respect to finding a place in the world. 

You can read the fairy tale here: http://www.andersen.sdu.dk/vaerk/hersholt/TheSilverShilling_e.html

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This is an old one: a recording of a talk I gave back in 2014 at L'Abri in the UK on the subject of how to reconcile theology and humor, with specific reference to Chesterton's take on humor. The recording is a bit patchy in places, and half-way through the talk I realised that I was coming down with a cold (a very unfunny thing in the midst of a reflection on fun, because ... irony. It was fun and serious and (hopefully) interesting.

Links: 

 

 

 

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December 13, 2017

71 | Incarnation as Apocalypse

In his most complex work - a study of anthropology and history in the light of the Incarnation called "The Everlasting Man" - G. K. Chesterton puts forward an argument that the Christ-story marks an apocalyptic shift in the way that people understood reality. Historically speaking, mythology and philosophy were always totally different ways of looking at the world and the two hardly ever gave each other a second thought. But in the Gospel narratives, with the birth of Christ, the two become one: no longer in
contradiction, but completely complementary. This idea is a kind of echo of a profound theological insight noted by the great church Father, Irenaeus of Lyons, known as recapitulation. This talk covers these ideas and more, and my hope is that by the end of it the Christmas story will have all kinds of brand new resonances for you — and maybe even a revelation or two.

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Duck Amuck: https://vimeo.com/204478956

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Whether we like it or not, research shows that all of us are given to being self-deceived. It turns out that a person generally believes to be true what they want to be true, even when evidence is glaringly opposed to their beliefs. Take for instance the fact that most people think they're above average when it comes to job performance or driving skills, as well as the fact that some people who really are ahead think they're not. What does this propensity for self-deception tell us about families and communities in general, and communities of faith in particular? Isn't faith, after all, just a socially accepted form of self-deception? This is the third in a three-part series looking at self-deception and faith. Helpful authors on the topic: Robert Trivers (Deceit and Self-deception), Gregg Ten Elsoff (I Told Me So), and Herbert Fingarette (Self-Deception). 

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

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Whether we like it or not, research shows that all of us are given to being self-deceived. It turns out that a person generally believes to be true what they want to be true, even when evidence is glaringly opposed to their beliefs. Take for instance the fact that most people think they're above average when it comes to job performance or driving skills, as well as the fact that some people who really are ahead think they're not. What does this propensity for self-deception tell us about families and communities in general, and communities of faith in particular? Isn't faith, after all, just a socially accepted form of self-deception? This is the second in a three-part series looking at self-deception and faith. Helpful authors on the topic: Robert Trivers (Deceit and Self-deception), Gregg Ten Elsoff (I Told Me So), and Herbert Fingarette (Self-Deception). 

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

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Whether we like it or not, research shows that all of us are given to being self-deceived. It turns out that a person generally believes to be true what they want to be true, even when evidence is glaringly opposed to their beliefs. Take for instance the fact that most people think they're above average when it comes to job performance or driving skills, as well as the fact that some people who really are ahead think they're not. What does this propensity for self-deception tell us about families and communities in general, and communities of faith in particular? Isn't faith, after all, just a socially accepted form of self-deception? This is the first in a three-part series looking at self-deception and faith. Helpful authors on the topic: Robert Trivers (Deceit and Self-deception), Gregg Ten Elsoff (I Told Me So), and Herbert Fingarette (Self-Deception). 

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

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November 18, 2017

67 | The Obstacle is the Way

Here's a quick provocation/meditation rooted in some of the wonderfully paradoxical thinking of (mostly) Heraclitus and (a bit of) Kierkegaard.

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Contact: unorthodoxy@zoho.com

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November 10, 2017

66 | The Law of Three

This episode offers a brief explanation of a fascinating way of looking at how new things happen. Said fascinating way of looking at things is referred to as the 'law of three' and it is derived from a slightly unexpected way of looking at the doctrine of the Trinity. For a more detailed exploration of the law of three, you can seek out Rev. Dr. Cynthia Borgeault's book 'The Holy Trinity and the Law of Three' (Shambhala Publications, 2013). 

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Mail: unorthodoxy@zoho.com 

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This episode offers a brief reflection on some of the ideas encountered in Nathan Schwartz-Salant's intriguing and insightful book, The Order-Disorder Paradox: Understanding the Hidden Side of Change in Self and Society (North Atlantic Books, 2017). The core paradox presented by Schwartz-Salant is that all new order creates disorder, as is evident in many of our personal experiences, as well as in larger societal shifts. 

See: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/548664/the-order-disorder-paradox-by-nathan-schwartz-salant/9781623171162/

Support this podcast: www.patreon.com/unorthodoxy

 

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