This episode forms part of a unique approach to the enneagram of personality called the enneagram of mimetic desire. This approach combines insights from mimetic psychology (informed especially by the thinking of René Girard and J-M Oughourlian) and various teachings on the enneagram to create a tool for discerning how desire works through us and those around us. The broader aim of the enneagram of mimetic desire is to help us to notice the desires we’re emulating and to figure out those desires that bring us into conflict with us, and in so doing to help us to better navigate our relationships.

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Email: unorthodoxy@zoho.com

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This episode forms part of a unique approach to the enneagram of personality called the enneagram of mimetic desire. This approach combines insights from mimetic psychology (informed especially by the thinking of René Girard and J-M Oughourlian) and various teachings on the enneagram to create a tool for discerning how desire works through us and those around us. The broader aim of the enneagram of mimetic desire is to help us to notice the desires we’re emulating and to figure out those desires that bring us into conflict with us, and in so doing to help us to better navigate our relationships.

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Email: unorthodoxy@zoho.com

Seeing Things as They Are: GK Chesterton and the Drama of Meaning: https://www.amazon.com/Seeing-Things-They-Are-Chesterton/dp/1498231888/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1529923816&sr=8-1

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In this episode, a few more questions are answered, which relate to (1) the story of this podcast, (2) the distinction between faith, hope and love, (3) if and how we can know about God, (4) how to grow using personality typologies like the enneagram, MBTI, big 5, etc. Useful books on the MBTI: Jung, 'Personality Types'; Quenk, 'Was That Really Me?' Then, Michael Pierce's MBTI typology chanel on YouTube is the best one I know of in terms of its depth and insights:

Michael Pierce: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmDcT_Pujk8vOcxk_IcnxtQ 

Email: unorthodoxy@zoho.com

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Support: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

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In this epside, we’re going to look at an answer to just one question: "When reading the gospels, and especially focusing on the life, death and resurrection of Jesus, how might we mediate between literalist interpretations and more 'Gnostic' or mythological interpretations of the story without necessarily getting stuck in a simplistic either/or? In other words, is there a middle-ground between reading Jesus as the God-Man and reading Jesus as myth?

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Email: unorthodoxy@zoho.com

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In this second Q & A episode, I answer two questions from Patreon supporters: one on the strange (seeming) absence of a system of posture and breathing in the Christian tradition and another on how I meditate, which amounts, as I explain, to something of a combination of lessons learned from Madame Gyon, Cynthia Borgeault and Anthony De Mello. In the episode, I recommend Richard Foster's book on Prayer.

Support: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Email: unorthodoxy@zoho.com

 

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An episode in which I answer questions from my Patreon supports around (1) why humor in the Bible is so difficult to spot, (2) how growing spritiually affects our ability to find belonging, and (3) whether Stoicism might support or hinder us with regard to the mystical. I mention a few books, including Steven Walker's 'Illuminating Humor of the Bible' and Mary Beard's 'Laughter in Ancient Rome.' I've also written about humour and theology here: http://journal.radicalorthodoxy.org/index.php/ROTPP/article/view/125

Support: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Purchase my book: https://wipfandstock.com/seeing-things-as-they-are.html

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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In this final episode in our Unorthodoxy series on the book of Exodus, we take a look at (well, contemplate) the famous 'Ten Commandments' — also known as the 'Decalogue'. These ten laws represent an ancient form of wisdom that still has an amazing relevance for us today. 

Support: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Email: unorthodoxy@zoho.com 

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In this penultimate episode in our Exodus series, we take a look at the theme of "seeing God's back" in the light of the set-up that leads to the revelation of the law at Sinai. In particular, you'll find some ideas here around why such a thing as the law might be a good thing.

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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Offering something a glimpse into my work life, this is a recording of a short talk that I gave recently to promote a way of thinking that I teach to my students at my university. In particular, I talk about how creativity deals with the relationship between the picture (content) and the frame (context) and, especially, with the importance of questioning and reinventing the frame (i.e. reframing). While the subtext is that of the profession of communication design, the principles offered are applicable to almost anything.

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy 

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In this episode, I read a slightly modified, translated version of a chapter that appears as 'Verbeelding en Christenskap' in Carstens, Udo, ed. 2013. Om te mag dink. Pretoria: Aros & Juventus, p. 135-144.

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

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