This episode—the sixth episode in this Unorthodoxy series on the book of Job—is the first of a three-part Inception-style dream-within-a-dream, or rather, series-within-a-series on the nature of the self. We focus, in this episode, especially how the book of Job (among other biblical texts) illuminates our understanding of the self. In this episode, we home in on the ego-self and the so-called "false self", and in the process some fascinating facets of the multiverse that is the human subject become clearer (well, hopefully). 

Support this podcast at patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Email: unorthodoxy@zoho.com

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The book of Job is one of the most brilliant and perplexing literary works to grace the stage of the human drama; and this is the fifth episode in a series on Unorthodoxy that focuses on this amazing book. The aim in this series is to look for unfamiliar nuggets of brilliance in what is, for many, an overly familiar text. In this episode, we take a look at the perplexing relationship between God, the "small s" satan, and the character we may not have realized is also on trial in the book of Job — you and me, the reader. Detours via the stories of Noah and Jacob invite some interesting hermeneutic speculations ...

Support this podcast at: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

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In this, the fourth part in this Unorthodoxy series on the book of Job, the focus is on the symbolic significance of the sea-beast/monster/chaos-dragon Leviathan, which gets a few mentions in the book of Job. In the process, we'll be covering how chaos and order always have a part to play in the drama of creation and creativity; it turns out that our sense of life's purpose is intricately bound up in the dialectical tension that arises in the collaboration of chaos and order. The role of language and dialogical companionship in helping us to navigate this tension also gets a bit of airtime here.

Check out the work of Gideon Nel here: http://gideonnel.com/ — especially his thematic exploration of water in the bible visualisation here: http://gideonnel.com/beautiful-water

You can support this podcast here: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

 

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The book of Job is one of the most brilliant and perplexing literary works to grace the stage of the human drama; and this is the third episode in a series on Unorthodoxy that focuses on this amazing book. The aim in this series is to look for unfamiliar nuggets of brilliance in what is, for many, an overly familiar text. In this episode, we'll take a look at the question of the meaning of life with reference to some of the coordinates for meaning that we find within the book of Job. To help us with the question of life's meaning, there's a bit of advice here from Viktor Frankl and Nietzsche thrown into the mix too.

Support this podcast at: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

00:0000:00

The book of Job is one of the most brilliant and perplexing literary works to grace the stage of the human drama; and this is the second episode in a series on Unorthodoxy that focuses on this amazing book. The aim in this series is to look for unfamiliar nuggets of brilliance in what is, for many, an overly familiar text. In this episode, we take a look at the absurd but surprisingly helpful question of what JS Bach can teach us about reading the book of Job, as well as what the idea of polyphony might have to say about a particular kind of consciousness or conscious awareness. Although this series is rooted in solid scholarship, scholarly detail has needed to be sacrificed for the sake of what is hopefully a more pleasant listening experience.

Support this podcast at: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

 

00:0000:00

The book of Job is one of the most brilliant and perplexing literary works to grace the stage of the human drama; and this is the first episode in a series on Unorthodoxy that focuses on this amazing book. The aim in this series is to look for unfamiliar nuggets of brilliance in what is, for many, an overly familiar text. In this episode, we take a look at the hermeneutical idea of a "surplus of meaning" and how the awareness of layers of meaning can begin to help us to look for fresh insights and new wisdom in, among other places, the book of Job. We also look at how (and why) the book of Job is not like a Netflix show. Although this series is rooted in solid scholarship, occasionally scholarly detail has needed to be sacrificed for the sake of what is hopefully a more pleasant listening experience.

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This is a recording of the second part of a two-part talk series on the Enneagram (The first part can be listened to in episode 52 of this podcast). The focus of this talk is on personal growth and on the importance of, in the process of growing, being reconciled to what psychoanalysts call the Unconscious: the shadow-side of the self and what Enneagram teachers refer to as the "soul child." You can support this podcast at: https://www.patreon.com/unorthodoxy 

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This episode offers an overview of the Enneagram of Personality, with a specific focus on the issue/defense mechanism of projection, as well as a number of core issues related to each type; namely (1) what the wounding message of each type is, (2) what each type avoids, (3) what each type projects, (4) what the primary defense mechanism of each type is, (5) what the primary vulnerability or sore spot of each type is, (6) what the pitfalls and vices of each type are, (7) what core virtue of each type has, and (8) the expression of wholeness that each type is invited into. I also offer a few images to give a feel for each type, and name some examples from history and fiction of each type. Right at the end, you'll hear a rough sketch of each type's talk style too.    

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This is a recording of a talk I gave recently to some kids at a local Christian highschool on the subject of brainwashing. The talk is something of a mix between media theory (following the approach of Marshall McLuhan) and mimetic theory (following René Girard). The idea was to present something provocative that got my young audience to think about their own context and how they're affected but it. I realize that some of the ideas here need more nuance than I was able to provide in a talk of this nature, so there's a pretty strong chance that I come across here as being more one-sided and over-confident on certain matters than is my usual preference/intention. 

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In this episode I'm talking about a few of the powerful life-changing ideas of the Stoics—philosophers like Epictetus, Seneca and Marcus Aurelius. I also (too) briefly touch on some of the overlaps between Stoicism and Christian theology. For more on that particular subject you can have a look at "Stoicism in Early Christianity," edited by Tuomas Rasimus, Troels Engberg-Pedersen, and Ismo Dunderberg. I refer here mostly to (my own take on) Epictetus's "Discourses and Selected Writings," as well as Marcus Aurelius's "Meditations."

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