In this, the eighth epsode in the Exodus series, we take a look at the final plague (the death of the first born in Egypt) and the outcome: Israel's freedom. Mostly, this is a kind of extended reverie on what the final plague symbolises, with a few notes on some of the lessons we gain from paying attention to anthropology and mimetic theory. 

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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We do not see the world the way it is, we see it the way we are. This is means that our perceptions of things are distorted, sometimes for bad, sometimes for good. Sadly, often, a distored take on things can lead to catastrophe. In this episode, Part 7 in our series on the book of Exodus, we take a look at the mimetic rivalry between Israel and Egypt, and the symbolism of the plagues. 

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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In this, the sixth episode in our series on the book of Exodus, we look, among other things, at God's apparent desire to kill Moses, and the fact that doing the right thing is almost always met with immediate contradiction. The episode also deals with some of the uncertainty and discomfort that happens before one of the most spectacular displays of miracle-making in literary history.

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Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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February 26, 2018

80 | The Centrality of Love

At the center of Christian theology is the claim that God is love (see 1 John 4:8). Love is at the heart of the ethics of Jesus (see Mark 12:30-31) and St. Paul (see 1 Corinthians 13:1-13), as well as being at the center of St. Augustine’s approach to interpreting scripture. “Love,” writes Erich Fromm, “is the only sane and satisfactory answer to the problem of human existence.” Viktor Frankl echoes this idea: “Love is the ultimate and highest goal to which man can aspire.” But what, precisely, is love? It is a surprisingly difficult question to answer, and yet it is absolutely vital that we answer it properly. Reclaiming the meaning of love may also hold the key to answering another question: what is the meaning of life?

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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In part 5 in our series through the book of Exodus we continue to listen into the conversation between God and Moses at the Burning Bush. The particular focus of this episode is on God's revealed name — about which the early Christians (among others) had rather a lot to say.

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Twitter: @duncanreyburn

 

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In this fourth episode in our series on the book of Exodus, a lonely shepherd steps off the beaten track to take a closer look at something rather odd: a bush, burning but not consumed ... 

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Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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In this third episode on the book of Exodus, we take a look at some of the complications that arise for Moses because of his difficult position between two brothers — pharaoh and Aaron, Egypt and Israel. Moses kills a guy, stops another guy from killing another guy, and then runs away from everything he has ever known. And yet, he can't seem to escape his own nature: he is, as we all are (and as we all seem to need to be), both a prince and a judge.

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Twitter: @duncanreyburn

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This is the second in a series looking at the meaning and resonancnes of the astonishingly profound book of Exodus. This series draws from a number of sources, from both Jewish and Christian traditions, as well as including a pinch of contemporary philosophy, to explore the way that the Exodus story still speaks to us today no matter who we are and no matter our own ideological commitments. Having looked a bit at the context of the Exodus story in the first episode, we can now turn to the significance of the "birth of Moses/Virtue" narrative.

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Contact: unorthodoxy@zoho.com 

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This is the first in a series looking at the meaning and resonancnes of the book of Exodus, which is one of the finest literary achievements in human history. This series draws from a number of sources, from both Jewish and Christian traditions, as well as including a pinch of contemporary philosophy, to explore the way that the Exodus story still speaks to us today no matter who we are and no matter our own ideological commitments.

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

Contact: unorthodoxy@zoho.com 

  

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This is a very short episode: a reading of GK Chesterton's wonderful little reflection on drawing and virtue entitled 'A piece of chalk.' The original essay appeared in the Daily News, November 4, 1905. 

Support this podcast: patreon.com/unorthodoxy

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